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Hey yall



I planted hot peppers in one end of my garden. My Jalapenos are being overshadowed by what I thought was Habanero but turns out to be Ground Cherry. My Peterson's guide says the berries inside the chinese lantern looking things are very sweet.



Anybody eaten these before? Are the worth losing my Jalapenos to?



Caveman
Thats weird I recently picked a bunch out of my uncles jalapeno patch.Still waiting for them to ripen.
I origionally sowed a multi pack of seeds in the area, so wasnt sure what would turn up. Thats why I misidentified the ground cherry origionally as habanero. Could be the factory lumped some ground cherry in with the jalapeno seeds. I see online you can buy them and that some folks use them as perenial ornamentals.



Caveman
I've grown them and it seems that the flavor is best if you wait for the fruit to fall off the plant. Just pick them up off the ground, peel off the wrapper and start snacking. Anyway, I didn't think they were too bad, but not good enough to plant again. Are you sure that they aren't those tomatillo things? I've seen them in "Salsa Mix" seed packets somewhere, and they look similar in pictures. There's normally a size difference, with the ground cherry being much smaller (think marble size).
I decided they werent worth sacrificing my jalapenos. The berry inside the pod was smaller than the end of my little finger. Tasted like a cross between a cucumber and a tomato. Not bad, but not as good as jalapeno. Pretty plant, if it hadnt been shading out the peppers I would have let it go.
[quote name='CPT CAVEMAN' post='81591' date='Aug 1 2006, 05:31 AM']I decided they werent worth sacrificing my jalapenos. The berry inside the pod was smaller than the end of my little finger. Tasted like a cross between a cucumber and a tomato. Not bad, but not as good as jalapeno. Pretty plant, if it hadnt been shading out the peppers I would have let it go.[/quote]



Can't blame you there! They're interesting but not something that my garden would miss. I find myself wondering if I'm going to get any of my peppers before the house sells and I leave it all behind.
Really? Ive already put up several quarts of pepper sauce (tobasco in viniger) plus made a lot of borscht with jalapenos, chilis and cayanne. Did an old pickled okra jar full of onion, garlic and peppers too. Ive been picking peppers now for over a month and they were the last thing I planted.
Ground cherry is a common term for several varieties of plants in the species of Physalis. Physalis philadelphica produces some of the larger fruit known as tomatillos in the south. A very, very necessary component of my salsa verde that I serve with my chicken enchiladas. Ironically, you also use jalpenos in the sauce. All you needed was a few other ingredients and you would have salsa verde ( green salsa). Ground cherries are in the nightshade family (Solanaceae) like potatoes, tomatoes and eggplant. Some people have slight allergic reactions to some of the nightshade family. I know that when I make eggplant parmesean and baba ganoush, the tip of my tongue gets a wee bit numb. Never had that reaction with tomatillos though. Kat
[url="http://www.elise.com/recipes/archives/001109tomatillo_salsa_verde.php"]Salsa Verde.[/url] If you never had it, try it.



I don't know about losing the jalapenos though. But, most grocery stores sell jalapenos, I don't know if you can get tomatillos like that.
Positively id'd as smooth ground cherry ( [url="http://2bnthewild.com/plants/H56.html"]http://2bnthewild.com/plants/H56.html[/url] )



Thanks for the salsa recipe!