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Hello good people

This weekend I spent some time with some living history people. One of their group was seasoning a dutch oven with a chunk of beeswax, over a open campfire. He said he learned this from an old timer and now prefers beeswax over lard or any type of grease. I dragged over a friend of mine over, a young lady who is a amateur beekeeper, and the three of us discussed cast iron cookware for quite awhile. Anyone else ever heard of this?

Bill
Never heard of it
[url="http://waywardspark.com/seasoning-cast-iron-with-beeswax/"]http://waywardspark.com/seasoning-cast-iron-with-beeswax/[/url]







DD
I guess its not so bad. They do put a light cooking of food grade wax on store bought fruits and vegs to make them shine.



My main issue would be the source of the beeswax. Food grade wax probably has all the impurities removed and they make sure that its stored and handled in such a way so as to minimize contamination.



But I would think that the oil could penetrate deeper because it is less viscous,
I sell beeswax at my stand, and I've never heard of that either. It doesn't surprise me though, beeswax is amazing stuff, it is so much better for your health than paraffin wax. I know Laura Secord Chocolate makers mix approx. 10% beeswax to keep the shape/form in their chocolates.



We have a cast iron wok, that we like to take camping and we keep it coated with bacon grease, I'll look into the beeswax.





AOC
[quote name='doctari' timestamp='1435013108' post='602060']

I guess its not so bad. They do put a light cooking of food grade wax on store bought fruits and vegs to make them shine.



My main issue would be the source of the beeswax. Food grade wax probably has all the impurities removed and they make sure that its stored and handled in such a way so as to minimize contamination.



But I would think that the oil could penetrate deeper because it is less viscous,

[/quote]



You can eat the bee wax. Since I was a kid, my great uncle always brought me a jar of comb honey (a jar with a chunck of the honey comb, still full of honey) when ever he came down from Oklahoma to visit. Now I have my own bees to get it from. Some people chew it then spit it out like gum, others swallow it.



But I've never heard of putting it on cast iron. I use cast iron myself in the kitchen. I agree that the oil would probably go deeper into the pores of the iron better, but I don't know. I use regular vegy oil or peanut oil or what ever type oil I have (exept olive oil. Heard it's not good but not sure).
Beeswax for cast iron is the frigging bomb. I changed over to using beeswax years ago. it'll never get sticky or go rancid like seasoning with vegetable oil. Takes all of about 10 minutes to do the job and your done.